Qualification by Web Pages

 In this guide, we'll go through examples of setting up qualification rules for the following types of web pages

  1. Landing pages
  2. High value product pages
  3. Pricing pages
  4. Pages that indicate company size
  5. Industry specific pages

The Importance of Web Pages for Qualification

One way many companies use to determine qualification is based on specific pages that someone visit on your website.  It’s no secret to demand gen marketers who are deep in the data that the majority of pipeline is typically generated from a small number of pages on your website.  In fact it’s typical that 80% of a B2B company’s pipeline is generated from by less than 10 pages on your website.

With that statistic in mind, it’s critical for you to know how many pages on your site generate 80% of your pipeline, and exactly what those pages are in priority order.  CMO’s like Asana’s Dave King even brand these pages internally so that everyone in the marketing department is focused on what he calls the “10 Golden Pages.”  Let’s take a look at a few examples of what these Golden Pages look like for a few different companies:

1) Landing Pages

Landing Pages are specific pages that you set up as entry points to your website for people who respond to specific campaigns.  For example, new financial services company Brex creates personalized landing pages that are tailored to specific companies.  In this case, any executive from Airbnb who responds to an ad lands on this page, where the content speaks directly to that person.  Any visitor to this page is automatically deemed qualified prospects for Brex.

A campaign landing page used by Brex and its corresponding URL
A campaign landing page used by Brex and its corresponding URL

2) High Value Product Pages

Many companies have product pages on their website that are of high value.  The product might account for a large percentage of pipeline/revenue or it might just have a high price point.  If your company knows that a specific product interest is typically of high value to your sales team, you can automatically qualify visitors simply based on traffic to that page.  Online survey company GetFeedback knows that their “GetFeedback for Salesforce” is a high value product, so any visitors to this page are deemed automatically qualified by the marketing team.

A high value product page at GetFeedback and its corresponding URL
A high value product page at GetFeedback and its corresponding URL

3) Pricing Pages

Many companies have one or more pricing pages on their website.  Typically visitors who are exploring pricing are interested buyers, butu not every product at every price point means that a visitor is qualified.  For example, email marketing company Campaign Monitor offers a specific price point for “high volume senders” which is where the large deals usually come from.  Anyone that indicated that they are a high volume sender is automatically qualified by Campaign Monitor

The Campaign Monitor pricing page and its corresponding URL
The Campaign Monitor pricing page and its corresponding URL

4) Pages That Represent Company Size

If a buyer’s company size is a good indicator of big deals for your sales organization, you typically have pages on your website that are built specifically for those companies.  In the case of project management company Asana, their deal size is based on the number of employees at the company they sell to.  So the larger the company the larger the size of the sales opportunity.  As a result, Asana has specific pages on their website for “enterprise” visitors and anyone who visits this page is automatically qualified.

Asana's website page (and branch) for enterprise prospects and its corresponding URL
Asana's website page (and branch) for enterprise prospects and its corresponding URL

5) Industry Specific Pages

It’s quite common for B2B marketing organizations to set up industry specific pages for a product or service.  For example, your product might be very applicable to buyers in the construction industry but not for those in the healthcare industry (maybe because of additional regulations in that industry).  For example, financial services company Payzer sells most of their larger deals to the construction industry, and therefore, anyone who visits their construction industry page is deemed a qualified prospect.

An industry specific page at Payzer and its corresponding URL
An industry specific page at Payzer and its corresponding URL

Summary

Many companies establish qualification rules based on web pages.  It’s no secret to demand gen marketers who are deep in the data that the majority of pipeline is typically generated from a small number of pages on your website.  In fact it’s typical that 80% of a B2B company’s pipeline is generated from by less than 10 pages on your website. With that statistic in mind, it’s critical for you to know how many pages on your site generate 80% of your pipeline, and exactly what those pages are in priority order, and create your qualification rules accordingly.

Next Steps

As a next step in your education, you might find the following guides useful

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